The brussels effect review

On a regular basis Acquis reviews books. Books that we believe stand out in the crowd and are of great relevance and should be read. Either because of the importance of the subject matter, or just because they are great books to read and enjoy. Oxford University Press, Professor Anu Bradford wrote an important book. The European Union develops policy and enacts legislation and regulation for many if not all sectors and industries.

The quality of EU legislation and high standards is a phenomenon and an example for many other countries outside the EU. But the main reason why industries and service sectors alike around the globe adapt to EU standards, is that by doing so access to the European market is ensured. No compliance — no EU market access. This will also be a reality for the UK and its companies post-Brexit. Either companies comply with the EU norms and standards, or they will fail to benefit from doing business with the second-largest consumer market and leading trading block in the world.

This also explains why many companies, industry associations and federations, diplomatic missions of third-countries outside the EUand other stakeholders invest already quite some time in managing their relationships with the EU Institutions in Brussels, engaging in the EU consultative legislative process. There is clearly more that can be achieved. With global governance being challenged, The Brussels Effect is filling a desperately needed void.

Close search. Book Review: "The Brussels Effect". At Acquis — we agree with that.Alan Beattie in Brussels. Not only will it have to keep complying with EU rules to sell into the continental European market, but in some cases the UK will have to choose which of the mutually incompatible sets of EU and US regulations it wants to adhere to in order to trade. Moreover, previous experience suggests that whatever regulation the UK chooses, companies operating in Britain may simply make their own decisions based on their need for global compliance.

Since the European single market was launched inBrussels and Washington have been engaged in a battle for their rules to become the international norm across a variety of fields that include chemicals, food safety and electrical standards. Sometimes the struggle is fought openly in forums such as trade deals or global regulatory agreements. But often the outcome is determined by their being such large consumer markets that companies are compelled to accept regulation.

Although the US may be more aggressive in trying to export its regulatory model, it is often the EU that makes the running. The broad philosophical differences between the US and the EU, in many sectors, are clear.

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The way the EU interprets the so-called precautionary principle, for example, has the effect of setting a high regulatory bar to the acceptance of new technologies, such as food crops that use genetically modified organisms, and in new chemicals.

By contrast, the US tends to put the burden on regulators to prove that a substance is risky rather than the manufacturer to argue that it is not. Others, such as potentially hazardous new chemicals, have to undergo stringent tests by regulators, including the European Chemicals Agency. There are some counter-examples, but they reflect underlying social attitudes rather than dispassionate risk management. For example, the EU is much more lenient towards unpasteurised milk and cheese than the US.

In general, however, European standards are stricter. Even more galling for US policymakers is that because companies find it much cheaper to run one compliance system than two, some multinationals adhere to EU regulation even when their operations are outside Europe and the US. Moreover, there are areas where regulations are mutually incompatible, leaving producers with a choice about which market to target. Canadian beef farmers who had lobbied hard for more access to the EU market in the recently signed bilateral EU-Canada trade deal have discovered that it may all be for nothing.

The EU bans carcasses that are sterilised using chemical washes, but it seems that US hygiene regulations imply they will not accept meat cleaned without them. If Prof Bradford is right, the trend towards a convergence with EU regulations seems likely to continue. But for those areas where one set of rules is not merely stricter than another but actively contradicts it, companies will be forced to choose. Get alerts on EU business regulation when a new story is published.

As international companies navigate geopolitical and market tumult, this report focuses on legal and regulatory change.

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It includes: EU data privacy; China pressing for more say on mergers; and the battle for supremacy on trade rules. Accessibility help Skip to navigation Skip to content Skip to footer Cookies on FT Sites We use cookies opens in new window for a number of reasons, such as keeping FT Sites reliable and secure, personalising content and ads, providing social media features and to analyse how our Sites are used. Manage cookies. Currently reading:. China puts its stamp on international deals.

Governments compete to take the wheel on rules for self-driving cars. Tighter standards of conduct for supply chains.

Intellectual property: taking the fight to the fakers. New twists in compliance with environment laws. Corruption scandals show why leaders should highlight ethics. Special Report EU business regulation. Some international businesses adhere to EU regulation even in their operations outside Europe. The EU and US have conflicting rules on beef. Alan Beattie in Brussels November 16, Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

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the brussels effect review

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Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. For many observers, the European Union is mired in a deep crisis. Between sluggish growth; political turmoil following a decade of austerity politics; Brexit; and the rise of Asian influence, the EU is seen as a declining power on the world stage. Columbia Law professor Anu Bradford argues the opposite in her important new book The Brussels Effect the EU remains an influential superpower that shapes the world in its image.

By promulgating regulations that shape the international business environment, elevating standards worldwide, and leading to a notable Europeanization of many important aspects of global commerce, the EU has managed to shape policy in areas such as data privacy, consumer health and safety, environmental protection, antitrust, and online hate speech.

And in contrast to how superpowers wield their global influence, the Brussels Effect - a phrase first coined by Bradford in absolves the EU from playing a direct role in imposing standards, as market forces alone are often sufficient as multinational companies voluntarily extend the EU rule to govern their global operations.

The Brussels Effect shows how the EU has acquired such power, why multinational companies use EU standards as global standards, and why the EU's role as the world's regulator is likely to outlive its gradual economic decline, extending the EU's influence long into the future. Get A Copy. Hardcoverpages. More Details Other Editions 4. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Brussels Effectplease sign up.

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The Brussels Effect: How the European Union Rules the World

When is this book expected to launch in India? See 1 question about The Brussels Effect…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4.

Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Apr 17, Bryan rated it liked it Shelves: current-affairseconomicsinternational-relations. An interesting account of the soft power of Brussels and always enjoyable to see Americans getting a taste of their own medicine for once having to dance to another country's tune rather than being the bandmasterbut rather dry and academic and with traces of the humourless self-righteousness so common among Europhiles.

Jul 13, Michele Wucker rated it it was amazing.We use cookies to improve your experience on our website. Although US officials are finally waking up to the need to govern the digital economy, America's laissez-faire approach has left the door wide open for the European Union to step in as the global rule-maker.

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And with two new landmark regulations, the EU has set its sights squarely on the US tech giants. The DSA, for its part, will impose more onerous obligations on Big Tech companies to disclose their algorithms or remove illegal or harmful online content, including hate speech and disinformation.

Together, these measures will assert significant new regulatory control over the digital economy both in Europe and beyond. Already have an account? Log in. The world is changing in fundamental ways, and the actions the world takes in the next few years will be critical to lay the groundwork for a sustainable, secure, and prosperous future.

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Book Review: "The Brussels Effect"

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the brussels effect review

Friend's email. First Name. Last Name. Phone number.The European Commission has just unveiled landmark regulations for the digital economy, setting yet another global standard. The European Union is expected to designate these companies as the "gatekeepers" of the Internet, justifying a targeted regulatory push to rein in their outsize market power.

The new regulations will complement the EU's antitrust authority, which has repeatedly been used to extract billions of dollars in fines from US tech giants and to mandate changes to their business practices. Under the DMA, for example, practices such as self-preferencing will be "blacklisted"—presumed illegal without the need for the EU to bring an antitrust challenge to demonstrate harm to competition.

The DSA, for its part, will impose more onerous obligations on Big Tech companies to disclose their algorithms or remove illegal or harmful online content, including hate speech and disinformation.

Together, these measures will assert significant new regulatory control over the digital economy both in Europe and beyond. The stakes for the Big Tech giants are particularly high because EU regulations often have a global impact—a phenomenon known as the "Brussels effect. To avoid the cost of complying with multiple regulatory regimes around the world, these companies often extend EU rules to their operations globally.

Unsurprisingly, Big Tech leaders and other critics of EU regulation are pushing back, accusing the EU of regulatory overreach and protectionist motives. But the EU is not unfairly infringing on successful US tech companies' commercial freedom, nor is it undermining US regulators' autonomy. For years, these smaller US players have had to rely on the EU—rather than on their own government—to challenge the giants in their industry.

Likewise, thanks to their global reach, EU regulations have brought significant benefits to American Internet users, many of whom welcome enhanced privacy protections and less rampant online hate speech. The United States' own inaction has paved the way for the EU's rise as a regulatory superpower. Embracing deregulation and techno-libertarianism as its approach to governing the digital economy, the US has long watched from the sidelines as the EU sets regulations for the global marketplace.

By abandoning international engagement and regulatory cooperation, the Trump administration reinforced this regulatory isolationism—effectively, albeit inadvertently, trading globalisation for Europeanisation.

But the winds in the US may finally be changing. Legislators and enforcement agencies are starting to wake up to Big Tech's excesses. Earlier this year, the House Judiciary Committee's report on competition in digital markets issued a powerful call to action and outlined a new vision for revitalising US antitrust laws.

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Moreover, the US Department of Justice is now challenging Google's monopolistic practices after tolerating them for the past decadeand the Federal Trade Commission—along with 46 of the 50 states, Washington, DC, and Guam—is suing Facebook as an illegal monopoly.

It is unclear whether these steps mark the beginning of a progressive antitrust revolution in the US, or whether they will stall in a divided Congress or before conservative-leaning courts that are accustomed to a more limited role for antitrust law.

In any case, the US would do well to abandon its hands-off approach to technology companies. It needs to stop being a rule-taker and start shoring up its own regulations.

A federal privacy law would be an ideal place to start, considering that the idea already has support from leading US companies such as Microsoft, Facebook, and Apple. A more robust privacy law would help the US reinstate data flows with the EU, which were halted by the European Court of Justice, owing to the lack of privacy protections in the US.

It would also allow the US to address its concerns about Chinese government surveillance of American citizens. The Trump administration's haphazard effort to ban the Chinese-owned social-media platform TikTok from the US market is not a substitute for regulations to protect Americans' personal data.

The case for renewed US regulatory leadership is even more compelling in view of China's increasing global influence over tech-governance standards. Chinese companies, all with varying ties to the ruling Communist Party, have supplied critical technological infrastructure to countries around the world. China has also supplied artificial intelligence-driven surveillance technology to numerous governments that are eager to pursue illiberal ends. Given China's authoritarian vision of the Internet, the US would gain much from working closely with the EU on regulating Big Tech and the digital economy.

Their disagreements when it comes to antitrust, privacy, and taxation, are manageable, and should be addressed as part of a broader effort to reset transatlantic relations.

Instead of fighting the EU's legitimate attempts to defend its vision of the digital economy, President-elect Joe Biden's administration should explore how it can work with the EU to advance a shared vision.

After all, citizens on both sides of the Atlantic want a human-centric Internet that is grounded in the values of liberal democracy and individual autonomy. Skip to main content. Home Opinion Project Syndicate. Anu Bradford. Click here to download it for your device.

The Daily Star Breaking news alert on your phone. Leave your comments Comment Policy.There is a significant challenge in formulating EU global action in law and its effects. Many authors diverge on its precise delineation as a subject field and also as a methodological question.

The EU is not a unified or homogenous global actor. This is particularly the case with respect to some of the most complex topics of global governance such as migration, data, the environment and financial services, where the EU seeks to have global effects and lead global change despite, among other things, asymmetric competence or weak institutional formulations.

The precise movement of EU rules beyond borders is also highly contested as an idea across disciplines. The casestudies traverse market competition, digital economy, consumer health and safety and the environment. One of the most important chapters is Ch. The Brussels Effect is underpinned by five elements- market size, regulatory capacity, stringent standards, inelastic targets and non-divisibility. I would contend that none of this is entirely robust or irrefutably scientific- but this does not somehow detract from its force as a compelling narrative of law, politics and power.

International organisations that the EU is party to or seeks to join etc and next generation trade agreements of the EU eg with regulatory cooperation are not carefully inbuilt into the argument.

Arguably, the Brussels Effect has two major features, firstly, a narrative of law, politics and power which is compelling and highly accessible and secondly, as Bradford herself suggested was required, a positive narrative on the EU globally, which despite its many challenges, complex formulations, unusual institutions and shifting is arguably highly successful global power.

In Ch. She engages in an interesting reflection albeit inconclusive reflection on why the Brussels Effect and China are a difficult fit, i.

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GDPR or has started to acknowledge the right to be forgotten. China arguably constitutes a complex casestudy because of the place of institutions, enforcement and the complexity of its market economy as to the State.

She has an interesting reply to this relying upon extensive empirical work as to EU competition enforcement, particularly where she shows how many US companies are the winners of cases where complaints are filed with the Commission p. She also has an interesting taxonomy of foreign governments responses to the Brussels Effect and what can be done, focussing upon the US, using the example of age-long disputes between the EU and US before the WTO p.

Will a Beijing Effect replace the Brussels effect she asks? Not yet, is her response, where China seems unlikely to become a source of global regulatory standards anytime soon, where its regulatory capacity and willingness to elevate the protection of consumers and the environment in pursuit of economic growth is not increasing at the same rate of its GDP.

One of the most blind spots for EU law and the Brussels effect is arguably Brexit- and vice versa- if EU law has such reach and effects, why not just retain it? Perhaps for many this will remain a mystery of Brexit rather than the Brussels Effect- for now.

the brussels effect review

Ultimately, it is the clarity, simplicity and novelty of expressing a contrarian view- that the crisis ridden Euro-saddled EU could be a superpower if viewed through its laws. European Law Blog. Leave a Reply Cancel reply.We use cookies to give you the best possible experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies. Home Contact us Help Free delivery worldwide.

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Click here. Description For many observers, the European Union is mired in a deep crisis. Between sluggish growth; political turmoil following a decade of austerity politics; Brexit; and the rise of Asian influence, the EU is seen as a declining power on the world stage. Columbia Law professor Anu Bradford argues the opposite in her important new book The Brussels Effect: the EU remains an influential superpower that shapes the world in its image. By promulgating regulations that shape the international business environment, elevating standards worldwide, and leading to a notable Europeanization of many important aspects of global commerce, the EU has managed to shape policy in areas such as data privacy, consumer health and safety, environmental protection, antitrust, and online hate speech.

And in contrast to how superpowers wield their global influence, the Brussels Effect - a phrase first coined by Bradford in absolves the EU from playing a direct role in imposing standards, as market forces alone are often sufficient as multinational companies voluntarily extend the EU rule to govern their global operations. The Brussels Effect shows how the EU has acquired such power, why multinational companies use EU standards as global standards, and why the EU's role as the world's regulator is likely to outlive its gradual economic decline, extending the EU's influence long into the future.

The Brussels Effect Chapter 3. Market Competition Chapter 5. Digital Economy Chapter 6. Consumer Health and Safety Chapter 7. Is the Brussels Effect Beneficial?


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